Archive for the ‘Sports Injuries’ Category

Today a post from Stadion’s Discussion Forum with questions on overtraining and recovery from injuries, followed by my answers. First the whole post: I am a taekwondo’er, been away for some months (bad ankle sprain that had me undergo surgery, which has taken months to recover) . . . anyways enough of my sorry story, […]


This post is a follow-up to Groin Pain, or On Athletes, Pain, and Discipline, where I gave advice to a Kyokushin karate fighter who was experiencing groin pain (pubalgia). Recently he sent me this photo, showing the result of following my advice on dealing with his groin pain. Alan Bacci, age 43, does hanging side […]


Non-athletes need discipline to keep working out; athletes need discipline to stop. Groin pain happens. It happened to one combat-sport athlete—a Kyokushin fighter and instructor—who then asked me for advice on dealing with it. Athletes, and especially combat-sport athletes, have high pain thresholds and high internal motivation. Those two traits combined make athletes vulnerable to […]


This post was written as my contribution to a series of posts on training young athletes, published in coach James Marshall’s blog. I will begin with tips not for the young athletes themselves but for those who train them. I begin by commenting on a concept from the post by Frank Dick, “before you get […]


In my previous post I answered a question on the use of resistance bands in improving kicks. However, the video example of a class practicing kicks with those bands showed such poor instruction standards that I gave my opinion about its instructor—quite typical for m.a. So today I have another example of a typical martial […]


My observations tell me that the key to a great and lasting performance improvement is not in trying harder but in removing obstacles. In other words, fixing faults pays more than overcoming them. Therefore, when asked to advise people how to improve their performance, my guiding principle is “Usun usterki,” or in English, “First, fix […]


The postoperative MRI showed a tear about 9 millimeters long. In the course of rehab this tear was putting the brakes on my shoulder’s recovery. By weakening the tendon, it reduced both the amount of resistance I could handle and the frequency of my workouts, and so it limited my strength increase.