Archive for the ‘Strength Training for Sports and Martial Arts’ Category

A recent exchange on training for strength and flexibility between Mr. E and me: Mr. E.: I have been using your video Flexibility Express, and I definitely see major improvement, though not as quickly as you indicate I should. One question regarding the squats into splits routine: How frequently should I be performing that series […]


QUESTION: “Flexibility Express doesn’t come up with a set schedule for workouts like when and which ones to do. Before I bought it, it said that I need to workout 15-20 minutes twice a week to gain flexibility. How should I approach this program in terms of scheduling.” ANSWER: Do it on the same schedule […]


I am posting at stadion.com old articles from Stadion News because I have been told that they “had some of the best training information out there.” Since yesterday I posted the first part of “The Role of Aerobic Fitness in High Intensity Efforts” and the first part of “Sports Skills and Strength Training”.


New article titled “Sequence of Conditioning Exercises for Fighters and Martial Artists in Long-Term Training and in a Single Workout” is posted on stadion.com. In this article you will learn about the sequence of strength and endurance exercises in long-term training and in a single workout. A rationally designed strength training program begins with developing […]


Workouts cause fatigue. Fatigue is necessary for making progress, but if a workout schedule is bad, the accumulating fatigue will stop an athlete’s progress. The whole article on optimizing the weekly schedule of workouts is at http://www.stadion.com/weekly-schedule-of-workouts/


Muscle Fatigue

27Jul13

Coaches and athletes need to know what fatigue is to understand all issues of the training process. The whole training process is predicated on fatigue and on recovery from it–the changes of training load, means of recovery, frequency and sequence of exercises and workouts, periodization, and nutrition. Without understanding fatigue it is not possible to […]


“Young athletes . . . can reduce their risk [of back injury] by strengthening muscles in the abdomen, as well as hip flexors and other muscles that support the back. . . . Typically, however, coaches prefer to focus … on muscles needed for the sport instead of on injury prevention.”—Dr. James L. Moeller, chairman […]