Posts Tagged ‘Thomas Kurz’

Running is the most commonly used form of movement for developing general aerobic endurance. It is a simple, natural movement, yet people can do it wrong. For a description of the correct running technique plus info on the influence of footwear on gait and posture, which affects athletic performance in every sport and martial art, […]


Experiments done on athletes long ago (Nawrocka 1967) determined the optimal sequence for teaching a new sports technique: 1. Name the technique and give a brief description, including the key whys (yes, before a demonstration). 2. Demonstrate the whole technique at full speed. 3. Ask the athlete to give a verbal description of the technique. […]


Apart from the internal focus in this demo, I also don’t like the short grip–which is great for twirling but not for power with accuracy at a long distance.


Think, if a method works for an old man, then for someone younger it will work double-quick . . . or much better. Would you like to know what to expect of your flexibility as you get near 60? Perhaps my experience will give you an idea, so here it is: Now, that I am […]


It occurred to me that goal-oriented people should ask “what for?” (and then “how?”) rather than “why?” It happened like this: An acquaintance has rheumatoid arthritis. Her joints–fingers, wrists, and knees–are swollen, deformed, and painful. She complained about the ineffectiveness of various treatments she had undergone. (In case you didn’t know, rheumatoid arthritis is an […]


This article is similar to the one on squats and back problems because the issues are similar. So here we go: Backs are ruined by defective execution of deadlifts, and the deadlifts are blamed instead of the incompetent instruction. In correctly performed deadlifts, the spine keeps its natural curves just as when standing upright, and […]


Backs are ruined by defective execution of squats, and the squats are blamed instead of the incompetent instruction. The chief mechanical cause of back injury while doing weighted squats is posterior tilting of the lifter’s pelvis, called “butt wink,” which during the squat causes reflexive flexing (bending forward) of the lifter’s lumbar spine. Those two […]